Fresh off our interview with Just a Gent we got the chance to interview trap and hip-hop enthusiast, Sam Kopelman know to his fans as, Branchez.

You may know him for his remix of Rhianna’s “Stay” or What So Not‘s “High You Are,” but after seeing his set at Hard Day of the Dead we will forever know him as a trap legend. From fast paced house (including a epic trap remix of Anna Lunoe‘s – BDD) a little 2 Chainz, and some unbelievable unreleased tunes. Unfortunately (but fortunately for Sam) Rustie didn’t show up so he got to play for an extra 15 minutes. It felt like an eternity of amazing trap music! We even got to hear a unreleased Alesso remix, that and I quote “Only my mom and and Dad have heard.”

Scope our interview to find out how Branchez looks like a sloth, his take on rap music, favorite banh mi, how many chicks he pulled with the song “Stay” and many more goodies!

 

Interview:

 

Electric Sloth: We just want to thank you for taking the time to interview with Electric Sloth.

Branchez: Of course, people say I look like a sloth, which I actually do. Sid the Sloth from Ice Age is similarly structured in the face. It’s a fact.

 

ES: I just want to congratulate you on that set, would you mind telling us the name of that new song?

B: It’s a remix. It’s a little sticky right now but it’s for Alesso and I definitely want it to come out soon.

 

 

ES: You’re a native of Manhattan, where do you live now?

I live in Brooklyn, still in New York.

 

ES: Do you think you’ll ever make your way out to LA?

B: I think maybe in a year when my lease is up; it’s like music camp out here. For the business I would come out here even though all my friends and family are here in Ney York, my favorite city in the world.

 

ES: I heard you got your start from Skrillex playing “Treat You Right” and “Shake” in one of his mixes?

B: Not quite, Flosstradamus played “Treat You Right” in their band mix and Skrillex played “Shake” in his BBC mix. The first thing was I sent Flosstradamus a track called “F Off” on Soundcloud saying, “Hey I think you might like this” and the Rihanna remix also got things going. I saw the biggest rise in the shortest amount of time with that one. In the Internet era, you can go to bed and wake up with things very different.

 

ES: Back in 2012, you mentioned you liked where the rap scene was going, in 2014 are you still into the rap and hip hop scene?

B: I still am very into modern rap and hip hop. Where I see it going is with the guys like Young Thug and Rich Homie. Guys who have good delivery, it doesn’t matter what you say nowadays as long as the good energy is there. That’s my favorite aspect of the game today: the young unique voice.

 

ES: Tell me more about this band you are starting with your dad.

B: Nothing serious, it’s just a little family love. No actual release.

 

ES: R&B side project?

B: Yeah that’s real; I have a record that should be out by the end of the year, the first one that I’m singing on. I’m trying to stay as versatile as possible. Someone can bang out to “Treat You Right” and make out to this record I’m putting out. In this era, why not? Put it out and see if people vibe with it.

 

ES: Research says you are a fan of swimming, what exactly does that mean?

B: Lake, ocean, pool are the top three bodies of water that I fuck with. Catch me in a hot spring or pond too.

 

ES: I also read you are a fan of “Bon me” Vietnamese sandwiches?

B: My favorite spot is this one on Brew Street in New York that my dad put me onto. It hasn’t changed since he showed me and I love it.

 

ES: What are you sampling lately?

B: Recently I’ve been into voice manipulation, trying to take it to a place I haven’t before. I’m trying to get away from standard sampling like reworking an old soul sound. If something catches my ear I’ll always be tempted to flip it though.

 

ES: You started beats at an early age; do you have any advice for young artists and DJs?

B: If you want to make a living off of it, put a lot of work into it. Everything is accessible in this era, but the guys at the top put in more work than anyone. I was on the road with Skrillex for six shows and as established as he is, he could step back and live off the hits he has already made but he was working pre-set and post-set. The more work you put in, the better you’ll get, and I truly believe that. Force the hours worked but don’t force the sounds.

 

 

ES: What would you say is in your typical ride at this point?

B: I’m pretty simple at this point, fruit, deli meat, and different liquors but my homies are pressuring me to get some Xbox games and stuff (chuckles).

 

ES: So I’m not sure if you are tied down, but how many girls have you been with based on the “Stay” remix alone?

B: I’m single, the game has been good to me but no one has made out with me after saying, “Hey you made that Stay remix.”

 

ES: We’re huge Zeds Dead fans and saw you went on tour with them, is there a lot of interaction between you guys?

B: I love those kids, that was the first bus tour I ever went on and I wouldn’t have it any other way. I’m still close with them, they’re here today and I’m going to go say hi at some point.

 

Branchez: | F | S | T |